Geographic Smartphone Use

In your city, how many users are iPhone, Android, Blackberry? Twitter use has revealed geographic usage patterns The statistician in me always questions this though. Maybe Blackberry & Android users are less likely to use twitter? (of my extended family, who has ~ 2 iPhones & 5 android – none of us tweet from our phones) However, it’s better than nothing. Here’s the city of Calgary:

https://www.mapbox.com/labs/twitter-gnip/brands/#11/51.0120/-114.1734

You know you have a smart oilfield when…

Petroleum Development Oman (66%) / Shell (34%) Joint Venture adoption of IHS CERA’s 2003 study’s recommendations for a Smart Oilfield and a connected field has enabled them to deploy technologies that:

  • Increased a mature oilfield’s production by 100K barrels/day. At $90/barrel this is $3.2 Billion/year in additional revenue.
  • Reduced drilling time from 39 to 14 days ($40K/day savings = $1M per drill saved). Saved $5M per-well cost (includes drilling and completions).

The cost of a connected field to one year of savings and revenue increase: less than 1%. Perhaps a smart oilfield is better than simply making educated guesses to increase reservoir pressure via water injection?

Redline’s Connected Field for PDO/Shell Joint Venture – This mature 45,000 sqr km brownfield contains:

  • 6600 broadband connection points
  • 52 base stations
  • 13 Gbps total capacity
  • 130,000 end devices

Source: CommTech West, Redline Seminar, Calgary, AB, May 28, 2014.

A Passion for Quality

I confess, I really like stuff that works. I don’t appreciate bugs and workarounds. Computers and software are particularly bad offenders. That’s why if I can’t control component quality myself (I build my own desktop computers), I’d rather trust vertically integrated products (e.g. Microsoft Surface, Google Nexus, Apple products). Vertical integration in its purest form is where the supply chain of a company is owned by that company. From a consumer perspective that means a greater focus on quality for all components of a service. In the computer world the Open System Interconnection (OSI) model describes all the components required to function optimally for services to work well. My passion for quality also happens to be why I have found my career focus on telecom (layer 1) and telecom engineering (layer 0), especially in a rural environment. If telecom does not work, not much else does.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OSI_model

Power is the most common cause of outages

Good infographic on data center downtime. What should strike you right away is the most common cause of outages is power. Also of note is that of the 7 causes, only 1 was IT equipment failure (e.g. networks, servers). This aligns to what I’ve seen with Oil & Gas field networks. The best two techniques for managing power issues is to add network redundancy and ensure qualified electrical engineers correctly design the network power sources.

http://www.emersonnetworkpower.com/en-US/Brands/Liebert/Infographics/Pages/Causes_of_Downtime.aspx

Goodbye Moore’s Law

Move over Moore, it’s Cooper’s turn to shine! Moore’s Law and CPUs have enjoyed a wild ride but the S-curve states that all good things come to an end. However, Cooper’s law (or the law of Spectral Efficiency) continues to enjoy momentum. That is, data transactions will double over the same area of radio spectrum every 30 months. If you’re in Telecom you already know this maxim: build, rebuild and build again. And it’s been going since 1895!

http://www.economist.com/news/21589080-golden-rule-microchips-appears-be-coming-end-no-moore

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cooper%27s_Law#Cooper.27s_Law

Internet for the O5B

The fight for the other 5 billion escalates … The other 5 billion being the folks who lack affordable internet connectivity (2nd/3rd world – this is a long term investment obviously).  Google has “project loon” which will launch balloons to deliver internet. Facebook just made an acquisition to support their investment in the Internet.org initiative. The acquisition will deliver flying drones with a 5 year continuous-flight capability. These drones fly in unregulated airspace (just climbing high enough to foil regulators) – a very low earth orbit satellite if you will. Another excellent example showing that internet is critical utility infrastructure and showing how the 1st world can provide “a leg up” to the 2nd/3rd world countries by using technology advancements.

http://diydrones.com/profiles/blogs/facebook-buying-drone-maker-titan-aerospace

Connecting everything is going to be painful at first

Excellent summary on the health of the “internet of things” (also called “Embedded systems“). “Embedded systems are commonly found in consumer, cooking, industrial, automotive, medical, commercial and military applications.” The title of the article actually summarizes the issue nicely: “The Internet of Things Is Wildly Insecure — And Often Unpatchable”. My personal experience confirms this. The problem is so large that the individual response is to shut down and not worry about it. The article further explains how this situation has come about and why there is no incentive for change.  My warning to companies and consumers is don’t expect “everything to be connected” to be a good thing at first. We’ll all likely be experiencing the pain of all this until purchasers become so angry as to finally form the incentive.

http://www.wired.com/opinion/2014/01/theres-no-good-way-to-patch-the-internet-of-things-and-thats-a-huge-problem/

Article: IT Should Stop Trying to ‘Surprise and Delight’

As BAs / Architects, I think we see this a lot. Personally, it makes me sad, because I know there are many more efforts of higher value if only we didn’t focus on trying to “Surprise and Delight”.  Summary points: 1) Organizations Should Seek to Meet Customer Service Expectations, Not Exceed Them. 2) Low Customer Effort is the Key to Meeting Service Expectations.
http://www.executiveboard.com/blogs/customer-service-in-it/

What is Business Analysis?

Project Managers and Business Analysts have roles that blur together and are often confusing. So what is it that a BA does?

“…a Project Manager will deliver, on time, on budget and in scope, the perfect set of concrete shoes; but without a Project Manager, a Business Analyst might never deliver at all. … If [an] outcome doesn’t provide value for an organization we have concrete shoes. And here is our sweet spot for business analysis as a discipline. Yes I said discipline. It is time to stop thinking about business analysis as a role, title or profession. Business analysis is a disciplined way of approaching any decision so as to provide value to further an organization’s objectives. The objectives of an organization are fulfilled through its strategy. …”

http://theglobalba.blogspot.ca/2013/09/the-future-is-no-more-uncertain-than.html#!/2013/09/the-future-is-no-more-uncertain-than.html

Are your best employees thinking about leaving?

A great intro to what to expect from recruiters. It summarizes the different job seeking types, how frequently they move jobs and the level of enticement needed. It then moves on to describe a successful recruiter/candidate interaction.

www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20130805013502-15454-are-your-best-employees-ready-to-jump-ship